Review: Moonstruck #2 by Grace Ellis

I’ve been eagerly counting down for the release of this second piece of Moonstruck the minute, nay, the second I finished reading (and reviewing) the introducing issue. So here’s Chet with a pretty accurate visual of my reaction to beginning #2:Moonstruck #2 1-- bookspoilsIn their world full of monsters, mythological entities and fantastical creatures, this follow-up piece begs the question, “Is magic unnecessary in this world where we use magic all the time in our daily lives?” And ends on an unforeseeable note regarding our brilliant cast of characters. The creators of this comic sure know how to throw a curveball at me, I’ll give them that. Also, the story went by so fast. You start to get into it and just like that it’s over.

Speaking of which, let’s backtrack to the beginning of #2, where all this is set against a backdrop of, “werewolves Julie and Selena are heading out on a real, 3D date to a magic show (along with a peppy third-weel-slash-centaur-Chet)! There’s something not quite right about this magic show, though. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but I’ve got a bad feeling about this. Will our heroes make it out in one piece? Who is this Dorian guy anyway?”

First things first: The fact that we get to accompany Julie and Selena (and Chet) on their magical first date set during a magic show was… enchanting. Which so are they together:

Moonstruck #2 2-- bookspoilsMoonstruck #2 3-- bookspoilsMoonstruck #2 4-- bookspoilsI got delivered pretty much everything I wanted in terms of a cute first date. I mean:

Moonstruck #2 6-- bookspoilsSwoon.

Also, I have to note how the art in here continues to amaze me in terms of fitting to the accompanying theme. The warm colors added immensely to the magical element.

Moonstruck #2 5-- bookspoilsI still don’t have the vocabulary to explain how it so great.

Moonstruck #2 7-- bookspoils

Chet is my icon who makes me want to take on the world, so I’m practically biting my nails to find out what’s next in store for my favorites. But I was more than glad to see that the characters remained just as I’d remembered them in issue #1: With biting humor and acerbic wit.

4/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Moonstruck #2, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

Review: So Much Synth by Brenda Shaughnessy

So Much Synth first caught my eye back in April with its dynamic last line of the introducing poem titled, I Have a Time Machine“the past is so horribly fast.” I hurried on to request it from the publisher (Copper Canyon Press); and was beyond ecstatic and grateful when my copy finally arrived in my hands at the start of this month.So Much Synth- bookspoilsSubversions of idiom and cliché punctuate Shaughnessy’s fourth collection as she approaches middle age and revisits the memories, romances, and music of adolescence. So Much Synth is a brave and ferocious collection composed of equal parts femininity, pain, pleasure, and synthesizer. While Shaughnessy tenderly winces at her youthful excesses, we humbly catch glimpses of our own.

Though I caught myself feeling a bit over-my-head with some poems at the start, the pace and momentum returned with the piece “Is There Something I Should Know?,” which at a whopping 30 pages never lost me for even one sentence. It succeeds immensely in capturing numerous themes of adolescence over the course of time, including periods (“blood and mess and cramps and hormones”), Judy Blume, books, angst, anxiety, catcalling, body-image and more.

On that note, I think it’s best now if I let the words and pieces speak for themselves with these quote excerpts:

“Adolescence is all absolutes: if bad, one must be the very worst
to avoid being mistaken for average.”

“I’d hide and lose and seek and find myself in every page:
laughing, rereading and then re-rereading out loud, disbelieving the details till my system could absorb them like the nutrients they were.”

“I’m not even sure anything happened to me.
Or to whom everything happened.”

And the fact that I read “Oh god, is there any music as good as what you heard
at fourteen?” the day I rediscovered this emo band I used to listen to at exactly that age was astronomical for me. [gets war flashbacks from the emo days]

I think it goes without saying that So Much Synth was not only beautiful and raw but real and aware of pain.” And I’m eager to continue on with Shaughnessy’s past and future works.

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Expected publication: October 10th, 2017

4/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying So Much Synthjust click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

Review: Hortense and the Shadow by Natalia O’Hara, Lauren O’Hara

Hortense hated her shadow. Everywhere she went, it went. Everything she did, it did. And every time night fell it grew, tall and dark and crooked.

So Hortense decided: the shadow must go! Only later, alone in the wolfish woods, she learned that a girl without a shadow is far smaller… a fairy tale about light and shadows. 

I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump this week, so this swift picture book couldn’t have come at a more perfect time to save me. I was even more surprised to discover that not only was it full of brilliant and darkly illustrated pages, I cherished immensely the message it put across to its readers, both young and old. Plus, the rhyming was another key point for my adoration.

And here’s what I mean when I talk about how the art will leave you reeling:

Hortense and the Shadow 1-- bookspoils

Hortense and the Shadow 2-- bookspoils

Hortense and the Shadow 3-- bookspoils

Hortense and the Shadow 4-- bookspoils

Hortense and the Shadow 5-- bookspoils

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Expected publication: October 5th, 2017

3/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Hortense and the Shadow, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!