Review: My Life by Golda Meir

 “One cannot and must not try to erase the past merely because it does not fit the present.”

When I first discovered My Life, my excitement regarding this book was sky-high because I had this urgent need, seemingly out of nowhere, to find out everything about Golda Meir, known as the “strong-willed, straight-talking, gray-bunned grandmother of the Jewish people.”

This is Golda Meir’s long-awaited personal and moving story of her life. For the first time, we experience through her own words how it happened that this amazing woman, born in Russia and brought up in Milwaukee, became Prime Minister Israel and one of the political giants of our time, without ever losing the warmth and informality for which she is justly celebrated.

I nearly ran to the library in my excitement and frenzy to know all about this grand pioneering woman. And as I was about to start my reading, holding this whopper of a book in my hands, I had a passing thought that whispered: “this will be something special.”

Thankfully the book started off on a great note as it read like a memoir of her family life. From her radically opinionated sister, Sheyna, who “did what her principles dictated,” to snapshots of Golda Meir’s politically charged adolescence, featuring debates on Zionism, literature, women’s suffrage, and more. To put it mildly, “I hung on their words as though they would change the fate of mankind.”

But then the narrative started jumping around in time, which had me confused as ever trying to keep up, at which point I had to pull up Golda Meir’s Wikipedia page to get a coherent sense of the events being described. And adding the fact that the main focus of the book was being shifted to center less on her personal life and more heavily on the politics set in that period of time. All these combined elements made my initial excitement subside by a landslide, and I had to rearrange my expectations for the following two-thirds of the book.

The only saving grace by this point was when Golda Meir dared to talk about feminism and “the inner struggles and despairs of a mother who goes to work.”

“Naturally women should be treated as the equals of men in all respects. But, as is true also of the Jewish people, they shouldn’t have to be better than everyone else in order to live like human beings or feel that they must accomplish wonders all the time to be accepted at all. On the other hand, a story — which, as far as I know, is all it was— once went the rounds of Israel to the effect that Ben-Gurion described me as ‘the only man’ in his cabinet. What amused me about it was that obviously he (or whoever invented the story) thought that this was the greatest possible compliment that could be paid to a woman. I very much doubt that any man would have been flattered if I had said about him that he was the only woman in the government!”

Had the primary focus throughout the first half of the book been on chronicling Golda Meir’s life, without adding on her many accounts of traveling and talking overseas to crowds and diplomatical figures about X and Y, would’ve made My Life a real tour de force in my eyes.

Like, this paragraph below about her father’s father who died long before Golda Meir’s parents ever met:

“He had been one of the thousands of ‘kidnapped’ Jewish children of Russia, shanghaied into the czar’s army to serve for twenty-five years. Ill-clothed, ill-fed, terrified children, more often than not they were under constant pressure to convert to Christianity. My Mabovitch grandfather had been snatched by the army when he was all of thirteen, the son of a highly religious family, brought up to observe the finest points of orthodox Jewish tradition. He served in the Russian army for another thirteen, and never once, despite threats, derision and often punishment, did he touch treife (non-kosher) food. All these years he kept himself alive on uncooked vegetables and bread. Though pressed hard to change his religion and often made to pay for his refusal by being forced to kneel for hours on a stone floor, he never gave in. When he was released and came back home, he was nonetheless haunted by the fear that inadvertently he might somehow have broken the Law. So to atone for the sin he might have committed, he slept for years on a bench in an unheated synagogue with only a stone at his head for a pillow. Little wonder that he died young.”

It’s passages like these that stayed with me long after I closed the book.

By the time I rolled around to the end of chapter six (‘We Shall Fight Hitler’) and the following chapter (‘The Struggle Against the British’), the pacing had picked up a bit more and settled on issues that I understood and cared for profoundly. And then, of course, there was ‘We Have Our State’ a phenomenal chapter that lifted my spirits with the signing of the proclamation after all the emotional turmoil and unprecedented loss endured beforehand.

So even though it took me some time to get my bearings, to find my way around this heavy read, My Life by Golda Meir is certainly a book I’ll think about for a while to come, for better and for worse.

4/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying My Life, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

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Review: the witch doesn’t burn in this one by Amanda Lovelace

the witch doesn't burn in this one 8-- bookspoilsPicking up this poetry collection couldn’t have come at a better time with having just read a book about powerful witches by Leslye Walton: The Price Guide to the Occult.

I really took to heart Amanda Lovelace’s The Princess Saves Herself in This One for its raw and honest take on love, loss, grief, and healing. Plus, the many feminist poems. So with this follow-up collection, I was keen on reconnecting with the author through her words.

As the blurb states, these moving, relatable poems encourage resilience and embolden women to take control of their own stories. The main focus is on self-love and acceptance, feminism, girl-power, and women supporting women. So I missed my favorite section of having more personal poems.

And with the focus being more on the aforementioned, I feel like I didn’t take in anything new and refreshing from the collection. If I take a scroll through my recent retweets on Twitter (@bookspoils), I can definitely see the same notions present in the witch doesn’t burn in this one. But they’re important messages to convey so I didn’t mind the resemblance that much.the witch doesn't burn in this one 1-- bookspoils

the witch doesn't burn in this one 2-- bookspoils

On that note, the poems that really stood out to me were the following:the witch doesn't burn in this one 3-- bookspoils

the witch doesn't burn in this one 4-- bookspoils

the witch doesn't burn in this one 5-- bookspoilsthe witch doesn't burn in this one 6-- bookspoils

the witch doesn't burn in this one 7-- bookspoilsThese are still sitting with me.

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Expected publication: March 6th, 2018

3.5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying the witch doesn’t burn in this one, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

Review: The Secret Loves of Geeks by Hope Nicholson

Starting out the last month of the year on the right foot with this follow-up to 2016 best-seller The Secret Loves of Geek Girls. It’s no secret by now that I absolutely adored said anthology when I picked it up last year. I even went back to reread my review recently and got to experience all those feelings of fun rush back in, like when I had first read them.

So I was more than ready to dive into this new world, where cartoonists and professional geeks tell their intimate, heartbreaking, and inspiring stories about love, sex and, dating in this comics and prose anthology.

But the one thing I came to notice were how few illustrated stories there were compared to The Secret Loves of Geek Girls. This follow-up paves the way for more essays and short stories to be included. That’s not to say that I enjoyed the written tales less, as my favorites below will testify. Still, I wish we would’ve gotten a couple more comics thrown in the mix.

On a brighter note, The Secret Loves of Geeks had me wrapped in the storyline from page one. Starting with Cecil Castellucci’s piece about finding love while camped out for six weeks (!) in line for The Phantom Menace, reminiscent of Rainbow Rowell’s Kindred Spirits.

“We were creating our own microsociety and it was all centered around this thing that we loved.”The Secret Loves of Geeks 1-- bookspoilsAnd then moving on to the next story by Saadia Muzaffar on online (Tinder) dating and doing things different this time. It had me enthralled from start to finish. I was entirely invested to see if the whole “get to know me in a way only I knew me,” without disclosing any Google-identifiable details, would work.The Secret Loves of Geeks 3-- bookspoils

I also came to notice how “The [isolating] feeling of otherness… of never quite fitting in, and of not knowing how to act, or how to be interacted with…” was ever present in this anthology, and I felt the core of it.

The last written piece I want to highlight was Hope Larson’s story: “I wanted to be seen, and yet remain unknown.” She had me eating out of the palm of her hand while recalling her meeting someone “who lights up the night and slows down time.”

Finally, I’d like to highlight some of my favorite illustrated pieces:

The Secret Loves of Geeks 6-- bookspoilsThe art style and colors are dreamy in the above.

Also, this panel from Bear With by Terry Blas:The Secret Loves of Geeks 4-- bookspoilsI wasn’t expecting to find a piece bringing me back to my days of loving Miranda, but I’m so here for this. Also, I cherish the tiny detailed shout-out to the iconic “What have you done today to make you feel proud.”

And last but not least, to quote from the introduction, Cara Ellison and Maddie Chaffer rage against the hypocrisy of controlling women’s sexual fantasies in “Women Love Jerks.”

The Secret Loves of Geeks 5-- bookspoils


Overall, it was validating and so incredibly affirming to read through all the different stories presented in The Secret Loves of Geeks. I’m rooting for more anthologies like this to come out in the near future.

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Publication Date: February 13th 2018

4/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying The Secret Loves of Geeks, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!