Review: Earth Hates Me by Ruby Karp

“Good luck. I hope you don’t cringe too much.”

I started this ARC on a complete whim while in dire need for a quick and fun read to take my mind of things. I was then pleasantly surprised to open the first page to discover an interview between Ruby Karp and Broad City’s Ilana Glazer. Given my hesitations, this was the perfect hook for me to read on. In particular, since the author’s writing voice sounded similar to that of Rookie’s editor-in-chief (and recent podcast host), Tavi Gevinson. They’re both Jewish white girls, well-known for writing articles online since the age of ten and above.

But focusing on Earth Hates Me, I appreciated how Ruby Karp acknowledged her privilege from the start of this novel. She didn’t sugarcoat things and brought her honest self to these pages, filled with essays and articles to keep your head busy and thinking for days.

It also made me realize a lot of new things about myself that I couldn’t necessarily put into words at first. I went into this book thinking it would come off as another cheesy read, but that’s far from it actually. I found myself and so much more in the pages of Earth Hates Me. Funnily enough, it felt a lot like watching an episode from Skam, my favorite Norwegian tv series also directed towards 16-year-olds. Similar to the latter, we have discussions of:

  • Young love and heartbreak.

“Being in fifth grade (and hyperemotional, because being ten is a lot to deal with) and getting my heart broken? It’s almost as devastating as the ups and downs of Nash Grier’s career.”

P.S. The shade thrown in here at the most deserving of people was extremely satisfying to experience.

  • Making the crucial point that sex-ed classes need to discuss both the importance of consent while simultaneously teaching not to rape.

“We need to stop teaching people only how to say no. We need to stop allowing boys to use force upon girls and vice versa. We need boys to understand that using sexual force is unacceptable, always. We need to teach people how not to rape.”

  • The negativity behind slut shaming, the importance of practicing safe sex, girl power, and feminism turned into my favorite chapter. Karp brought up so many noteworthy notions similar to the above quote.
  • The matter of not feeling good enough in your own skin (“I looked for validation in other people because I couldn’t find it in myself.”) while also discussing beauty and self-worth and how it feels different for each individual, as it should.
  • Experiencing unrequited love, also known as “the heartbreak of heartbreaks.”

“When Angela Chase said that obsessions aren’t real, she meant it. Ninety-five percent of the time, what you want is just a fantasy. Your fantasies will never live up to your realities—that’s just fact. I couldn’t get over my idea of what Greg and I could have been. I couldn’t get over my idea of who he was and what I could have meant to him. The real Greg—the one who didn’t like me back—he wasn’t the Greg I wanted.”

This was something I was particularly glad to have read today.

  • She talks about mending your shattered heart, including a healthy dose of her own experiences with failed relationships “(real or mostly fantasy).”
  • Friend breakups and how they can hurt just as much as romantic ones.

“Some friends are exactly what you need them to be in the moment, but not forever.”

  • The suffocating stress of her performing arts high school. (“We’re like Victorious except without the puppet component.”) Plus, the pressure to do well in school while also addressing the mess that is the education system and standardized tests.

“Your grades are not a reflection of who you are.”

  • And a welcome addition of pop culture references thrown in, from social media to Hannah Montana, Mean Girls, Sex and the City, and Hamilton the musical.
  • Being raised by a single mother and their close relationship nowadays. Showing healthy mother/daughter relationships is the key to my heart.

“If you’re like me and your mom is always the though guy for you, you never really need to be the strong one. Because of this, my childhood consisted of tears the second anyone wasn’t nice to me.”

So as you can see by the above list, for the first half I was in a state of pure bliss while reading. The arguments brought up by the author were ones I wholeheartedly agreed with. Karp was either saying something I hadn’t been able to put into words before or the complete opposite, where it was just a comfort to have someone write down a similar opinion I held. Like her point about parents being humans too is one I’ve made before, so it was exciting to see her agree.

“We forget that our parents were once young and had lives where they also felt out of place at a party they didn’t know enough people at. Our parents aren’t minions from another planet, and as hard as it is to remember that, it’s important we try to, so we don’t spend every moment hating them.”

Ruby captured so many quiet and loud moments we’ve all experienced that “couldn’t have been more uncomfortable, more real, more dramatic, and more heartfelt…” Reading this felt like a much-needed change in scenery, a breath of fresh air. While I struggle with getting invested in fictional young adult books, I’ve noticed that the ones set in the nonfiction genre I manage to devour in a heartbeat. Plus, the addition of having so many laugh-out-loud moments weighed in as well.

I also began observing how each essay started out quite strong, especially ones with personal anecdotes included in the mix. But without fail, I knew the end of a chapter was coming when the advice started getting vague. Like: “Live your life the way you want to be living it.” Or “Go out into the world and be the change you want to see.” These are all valid points, just that a lot of influential people have said it before her and will continue to say it after…

But setting that little note aside, my day passed by in a happy blur thanks to being too invested in this book to look at the clock. So I’m definitely curious to see what’s next in store for Ruby Karp.

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Expected publication: October 3rd, 2017

3.5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Earth Hates Me, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

Review: The Atlas of Beauty by Mihaela Noroc

This collection seemed like the perfect blend between Strong Is the New Pretty by Kate T. Parker and Brandon Stanton’s Humans of New York. So the wait to get approved for this ARC was nearly excruciating with me checking my emails every day for a week. But I’m glad to say that it lived up to the hype I created in my mind.

Since 2013 photographer Mihaela Noroc has traveled the world with her backpack and camera taking photos of everyday women to showcase the diversity of beauty all around us. The Atlas of Beauty is a collection of her photographs celebrating women from all corners of the world, revealing that beauty is everywhere, and that it comes in many different sizes and colors. Noroc’s colorful and moving portraits feature women in their local communities, ranging from the Amazon rainforest to London city streets, and from markets in India to parks in Harlem, visually juxtaposing the varied physical and social worlds these women inhabit. Packaged as a gift-worthy, hardcover book, The Atlas of Beauty presents a fresh perspective on the global lives of women today.

I have nothing but the utmost respect and admiration for the women featured in here. They bring dignity, strength, and inner beauty that shines from page to page. From each of them I learned or was reminded of something new, whether that be tolerance, kindness, resilience, natural and authentic beauty, serenity, strength, and generosity. Plus, the vibrant and colorful photographs really brought something new to the table.

However, as captivating as the images were, I feel like the words that accompanied them, save for a few, failed to move me. In comparison to the collections I mentioned at the start of my review, it was difficult to ignore how bland the text is. I wanted to see what lies beneath the surface, to feel like we’re getting to know the person in front of us… But again, save for a few, I rarely encountered it in this collection. Also: I’m low-key sad that the utterly powerful cover picture wasn’t included in here.

On a brighter note, I’d love to share the photographs of the enthralling women that captivated me:

The Atlas of Beauty 1-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 2-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 4-- bookspoils

Pokhara, Nepal:The Atlas of Beauty 3-- bookspoils

Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan:The Atlas of Beauty 5-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 6-- bookspoilsThe Atlas of Beauty 7-- bookspoils

New York, USA:The Atlas of Beauty 8-- bookspoils

Wakhan Corridor, Afghanistan:The Atlas of Beauty 9-- bookspoils

Tehran, Iran:The Atlas of Beauty 10-- bookspoils

Nampan, Myanmar:The Atlas of Beauty 11-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 12-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 13-- bookspoils

 

Amazon Rainforest, Ecuador:The Atlas of Beauty 14-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 15-- bookspoils

I was truly surprised to see Eden Saban in the above, since she’s quite well-known in Israel, thanks to being on the last season of Big Brother. So now I’m quite eager to find out if the author randomly stumbled upon her and asked for a picture, or if they set this up….

The Atlas of Beauty 16-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 17-- bookspoils

On that bitter-sweet note, the sharp women and girls featured in The Atlas of Beauty have made a new fan out of me. I’m definitely interested in keeping up with Mihaela Noroc’s photography works next in the making.

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Expected publication: September 26th, 2017

5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying The Atlas of Beauty, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

Review: What We Buried by Caitlyn Siehl

“You are not Atlas and the world is not a burden for you to carry.” 

I’ve seen this poetry collection a number of times online, but had no idea what to expect until I opened the book and was instantly enchanted by the second poem titled “Three Questions.” And since I can’t narrow it down to just one quote – I’m in love with the whole of it and how each line adds something more – I’ve decided to share the full poem:

“My mother tells me
that when I meet someone I like,
I have to ask them three questions:

1. what are you afraid of?
2. do you like dogs?
3. what do you do when it rains?

of those three, she says the first one is the most important.
“They gotta be scared of something, baby. Everybody is. If they aren’t afraid of anything, then they don’t believe in anything, either.”I asked you what you were afraid of.
“spiders, mostly. being alone. little children, like, the ones who just learned how to push a kid over on the playground. oh and space. holy shit, space.” 
I asked you if you liked dogs.
“I have three.”
I asked you what you do when it rains.
“sleep, mostly. sometimes I sit at the window and watch the rain droplets race. I make a shelter out of plastic in my backyard for all the stray animals; leave them food and a place to sleep.”
he smiled like he knew.
like his mom told him the same 
thing.
“how about you?”

me?
I’m scared of everything.
of the hole in the o-zone layer,
of the lady next door who never
smiles at her dog,
and especially of all the secrets 
the government must be breaking
it’s back trying to keep from us.
I love dogs so much, you have no idea.
I sleep when it rains.
I want to tell everyone I love them.
I want to find every stray animal and bring them home.
I want to wake up in your hair
and make you shitty coffee
and kiss your neck
and draw silly stick figures of us.
I never want to ask anyone else
these questions
ever again.”

Naturally after that I went on with quite high expectations that were for the most part met. The pieces after the above, though, focused heavily on love and heartbreak and “I’m in love with the shape of you” style poems, which I wasn’t really feeling… Also, poems like “Do not fall in love with people like me” set my mood from 100 to 0 real quick.

But just when I was starting to worry that this collection was going to be all about relationships and their aftermath, the narrative shifted to center on feelings of strength with feminist undertones, and I was all the more enraptured. Here are a few of those:

What We Buried 1-- bookspoils

 

What We Buried 2-- bookspoils

 

What We Buried 3-- bookspoils

 

What We Buried 4-- bookspoils


In the end, I was won over by the sheer power I felt while reading about the ineffable strength and endurance, suffering and survival that was explored in What We Buried.

“We survive by surviving.
We do it unconsciously,
the way our bodies remember to
breathe, even when we’re asleep.
The first step is always deciding
to take the first step.”

Also, I listened to this groundbreaking song on repeat while reading, thanks to the most recent Skam clip that’s been utterly and completely carved into my heart:

3.5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying What We Buried, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!