Review: Saga, Vol. 7 by Brian K. Vaughan

Finally reunited with her ever-expanding family, Hazel travels to a war-torn comet that Wreath and Landfall have been battling over for ages. New friendships are forged and others are lost forever in this action-packed volume about families, combat and the refugee experience.

I was worried going into this considering the fact that it’s been a hot minute since I read the previous volume. But I needn’t have worried, the world Vaughan has created in the Saga series is one easily slipped back into. And if I could sum up this read in one panel, I think Hazel said it best:

Saga, Vol. 7 1-- bookspoilsThis review contains *spoilers*.

So let’s jump right into business:

  • We’re in the middle of war throughout these issues, so people are being killed off left and right… And it was just utterly heart-shattering. So many characters I’ve grown attached to were taken from me far too soon.
  • Speaking of, I’m still shell-shocked that my all-time favorite sacrificed herself for the “greater good” all thanks to one of my least favorite characters:
    Saga, Vol. 7 3-- bookspoilsI get choked up every time I think about this.
  • There’s also a lot of tension simmering between everyone, which is completely understandable under their strained circumstances, but still hard to take in.
    Saga, Vol. 7 2-- bookspoilsOh, I definitely was. But Hazel and Izabel have such a powerful dynamic with one another that it physically hurt me to see them like this… for the last time, nonetheless.

Saga, Vol. 7 4-- bookspoilsHazel has experienced so much damn grief in her young life, and I just can’t bear to see her hurt anymore. It’s like every time she gains a new positive force in her life, she ends up losing someone or something else.Saga, Vol. 7 11-- bookspoilsHer commentary, though heartbreaking, remains to be one of my favorite aspects about this series.

  • On a more uplifting note (if that’s even possible with Saga), the art in here is as stunning as ever:Saga, Vol. 7 5-- bookspoilsSaga, Vol. 7 6-- bookspoils
  • The humor in this series remains to be superb in lightening up the blue mood.Saga, Vol. 7 8-- bookspoilsP.S. I’m forevermore grateful those bastards in the red coat got what they deserved.
  • I was beyond ecstatic to have finally met Gwendolyn’s wife!!Saga, Vol. 7 10-- bookspoils Simply a master of words.
  • And to end this list, I adored how the first issue in this volume had some lively fanart included at the end, especially this one for Izabel:Saga, Vol. 7 12-- bookspoilsI agree wholeheartedly with Hernandez about Izabel, particularly the very first line which couldn’t have better described her: “Izabel is the perfect representation of three things I’ve always felt reassured by: fluorescent pink, guardian ghosts, and intestines.” 

So with all that happened in this single volume, I’m still having to wrap my mind around everything. I genuinely feel like Hazel in this panel:

Saga, Vol. 7 7-- bookspoilsIf nothing else, Vaughan knows how to keep me on the edge better than anyone else. And as usual, I cannot wait for what’s in store next.

4/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Saga, Vol. 7 , just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

Review: Why I March by Abrams Books

I truly couldn’t have been more happier when I gracefully received my physical ARC of Why I March. In fact, I was so over the moon that my mom took notice and became curious when I showed her the beautiful book:Why I March 1-- bookspoils(I even painted my nails to match that gorgeous cover.)

We ended up browsing this powerful accumulation of photographs together, which made it that more precious for me. I’ll just never get tired of reading powerful collections about feminism and supporting immensely important causes (see: Why We March & Nasty Women).

On January 21, 2017, five million people in 82 countries and on all seven continents stood up with one voice. The Women’s March began with one cause, women’s rights, but quickly became a movement around the many issues that were hotly debated during the 2016 U.S. presidential race–immigration, health care, environmental protections, LGBTQ rights, racial justice, freedom of religion, and workers’ rights, among others.

Featuring images of people in snow gear in Antarctica; women holding “Love Trumps Hate” signs in Durban, South Africa; and little girls in the street of New York City; Why I March is organised by continent and showcases the recurring themes of inclusion and intersectionality that the March so embedded.

So without further ado, here are some of my favorite pieces:

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Why I March 12-- bookspoilsMy favorite, Uzo Aduba!!!

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I think it goes without saying that I’ll cherish this book for a long time to come. And also, let’s be real, show it to anyone who’s in my near proximity. My love runs so deep that I wasn’t even mad when I received a painful paper cut from flipping a certain page wrongly…

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Expected publication:  February 21st, 2017

5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Why I March, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

Review: Nasty Women by 404 Ink

“No one can do this alone and now more than ever we need each other.”

With intolerance and inequality increasingly normalised by the day, it’s more important than ever for women to share their experiences. We must hold the truth to account in the midst of sensationalism and international political turmoil. Nasty Women is a collection of essays, interviews and accounts on what it is to be a woman in the 21st century.

I’ve shared my immense excitement for this riveting collection before in my original Skam book tag, so I was beyond ecstatic to finally complete my journey. Full of inclusive, educational and politically relevant essays, this collection breaks all barriers. AND I LOVED IT.

Also, I’m beyond grateful that the triggering essays had warnings at the start. So I did end up skimming or outright skipping some pieces because my heart can’t handle certain topics. But, again, I’m immensely thankful for the mentions of trigger warnings at the start of certain essays.

Plus, I learned so much in the span of just 240 pages, and my mind is still reeling. Touching upon topics such as:

  • institutional sexism in the medical profession, along with contraception and women’s health.
  • the year 2016. It was… tough, socially and politically.
  • immigration. And the likes of certain people in their white, middle class bubble still believing that “Difference is bad. Difference is dangerous.”
  • female icons.
  • raising awareness of LGBTQIA+ rights.
  • racism, sexism and microaggressions being uttered in the same breath.
  • disability, faith, pregnancy, grief, underrepresented bodies, and so much more are also respectively addressed.
  • the reclamation of the phrase ‘nasty woman’ ‘a pretty glorious thing’.

There are also so many game-changing and mesmerizing quotes in here, I feel compelled to share them all in this review, instead of going out to shout it from the rooftops… It seems to be the wiser and more practical option, somehow.

“As a black woman in the Dirty South, can someone please explain to me how America was great, when it was great, and when it stopped being great?
I make ~70% of the salary of white male counterparts in my industry and specialty. Statistics show that I am significantly less likely to be married in my lifetime than any white female.The establishment of whiteness as normal and the impact of slavery negatively affects black women disproportionately to every other ethnic group in almost every aspect of American life. I’ve spent my entire adult life seeking the Greatness of America, but I’ve yet to find it. Can I find this Greatness with Google Maps?”

“You’re expected to feel grateful towards a country that has given you a better life than you would have had otherwise, but the idea of feeling grateful towards Britain makes me feel as if we’re in a host country, rather than our own.We have to give back more than those who aren’t a product of immigration.We have to earn our place here.We have to never give anyone a chance to say that we shouldn’t be here.”

“Success to me is no longer ‘passing’, but standing out. Making a measured difference. Changing attitudes, opinions, through being visible and asking questions that challenge oppression. Carving out a new space through the process of not accepting less than inclusion.”

“That being good means different things to different people and it’s impossible to please everyone.That pleasing everyone should never be anyone’s goal.That being good was not making me happy, in fact it was making me lose myself. A good woman is not necessarily a happy woman.And I choose happiness above all. Freedom.”

“‘Not everything is about race.’
‘Not everything is sexist.’
Perhaps not. But enough of it is for it to be an on-going problem that we simply cannot sweep under the carpet anymore. Being dark and female has made me hyperaware of nonsense, insults and abuse targeted at me and if I want change, I have to fight for it and write about it. Women like me are on the receiving end of both bigotries, so big congratulations for proudly proclaiming that you ‘don’t see race’ and that ‘men and women are completely equal in this day and age’. It’s great that you are privileged enough to never have to deal with both issues, so you can just speak it out of existence and deny misogynoir.”

“We need allies. We need support, we need you to acknowledge your white privilege and we need to be believed when we open up about the shit we’ve had to deal with our whole lives.
If all those things are too hard for you to accept and put into
practice, then you are not an intersectional feminist, wanting equality for all women, regardless of race, sexual orientation, class, etc., and if you are not an intersectional feminist then you are not a feminist at all. Remove your badge and hang it up for someone else to use because the battle for equality will only ever be but only half won.”

“The world is a dangerous place right now, but not as dangerous as a nasty woman with a pen in her hand and story to tell. These voices telling our truths cannot be shaken and they certainly will not be drowned out any more.
Why fear us when you can join us?”

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Expected publication: March 8th, 2017

5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Nasty Women, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!