Review: Sea of Strangers by Lang Leav

If this isn’t your first time reading Lang Leav’s work, you pretty much know what to expect off the bat. With the turn of every page, Sea of Strangers invites you to go beyond love and loss to explore themes of self-discovery and empowerment as you navigate your way around the human heart.

Though this collection has nothing new going on for it, compared to the two previous collections I read and reviewed (Lullabies & The Universe of Us), sometimes a familiar writing style is a comfort I tend to seek. And with the news of Sea of Strangers, I was surprised to find myself delighted for a new collection so soon after her latest, The Universe of Us.

Speaking of which, it was an exciting moment to realize that the stage I was in when I read her last collection is radically different from where I am today reading her newest release.

But I was a bit disappointed to find that the usual pages dedicated to Leav’s art pieces weren’t present this time around. But since I read an ARC, I’ll keep an eye out to see if the final version differs.

This time around I also felt like hidden gems were spread far and few in-between, but with some digging around I found the ones I’d like to share next:

Sea of Strangers 1-- bookspoils

 

Sea of Strangers 2-- bookspoils

 

Sea of Strangers 3-- bookspoils

 

Sea of Strangers 4-- bookspoils

 

Sea of Strangers 5-- bookspoils

 

Sea of Strangers 6-- bookspoils

 

Sea of Strangers 7-- bookspoils

 

Sea of Strangers 8-- bookspoils

 

Sea of Strangers 9-- bookspoils


Finally, this is the perfect opportunity to mention the song below that I’ve been listening to for three days straight without fail:

“But there is a light in the dark
And I feel its warmth
In my hands, in my heart
But why can’t I hold on?”

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Publication Date: January 9th 2018

3/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Sea of Strangers, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

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Review: milk and vine by Adam Gasiewski & Emily Beck

I knew that all those hours I wasted watching funny vine compilations* were not for naught. I mean, for better or for worse, words will never suffice how amazed I am that this is an actual book I read as a “tribute to the late and great Vine app.”

Parodying the popular poetry book Milk and Honey, Milk and Vine beautifully portrays the best vines of all time in this modern poetic format. Milk and Vine is truly a delight for the sensations, bringing back the riveting quotes we all laughed at together as a united internet community.

There’s no standard way to review this, since this isn’t your conventional poetry collection… But I’ll try to stick to my normal format and insert a couple of my favorite pieces:

milk and vine 1-- bookspoilsI wanted to watch the film Spider-man: Homecoming on a Wednesday solely because of this vine.milk and vine 2-- bookspoils

 

milk and vine 3-- bookspoils

I was low-key ecstatic to find vines I hadn’t yet known about.

Also, I’m taking the promise at the end of the book dead serious: “Be on the lookout for our next book, Milk and Tweets, coming very soon!”

3/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying milk and vine, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

*Here are some of my favorite vine compilations, as noted at the start of the review:

Review: Wild Embers by Nikita Gill

Wild Embers 2-- bookspoils

Wild Embers explores the fire that lies within every soul, weaving words around ideas of feeling at home in your own skin, allowing yourself to heal, and learning to embrace your uniqueness with love from the universe.

Featuring rewritten fairytale heroines, goddess wisdom, and poetry that burns with revolution, this collection is an explosion of femininity, empowerment, and personal growth.

I went into this not knowing what to expect from the author, especially after feeling a bit disconnected with the writing in Your Soul is a River. But Nikita Gill had me pleasantly surprised with this follow-up book.

I recently came to the realization, after some much-needed trial and error with multiple poetry collections, than I enjoy my poems focused more on self-love over romantic love. And Wild Embers brought just that to the table. I would go so far as to say that this is the ultimate self-care poetry collection. The practice of learning to love yourself is a continuous theme over the course of these poems, rather than just making an appearance here and there. So are the themes of girl power, kindness and confidence, the grandiosity of space (her fascination with the intergalactic was so contagious, I now have my eyes set on reading What We See in the Stars), rewriting classic Disney fairytales to fit a more feminist point of view, and the powerful women in mythology. Speaking of the last two, I really enjoyed Gill’s modern take on the question: What if the real story was something completely different? It added something refreshing that I hadn’t seen before in previous poetry collections.

“They may have taken us down individually, but they cannot destroy an army made of us all.”

And to share a few of my favorite caught gems from Wild Embers:

Wild Embers 1-- bookspoils

Wild Embers 3-- bookspoils

Wild Embers 4-- bookspoils

Wild Embers 6-- bookspoils

Wild Embers 5-- bookspoils

Wild Embers 6-- bookspoils

Wild Embers 7-- bookspoilsThe last poem was a majestic note to end on.

And speaking on the theme, I listened to the acoustic version of Love Yourself while reading, which really amped up my experience:

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Publication Date: November 16th, 2017

4/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Wild Embers, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!