Review: The Atlas of Beauty by Mihaela Noroc

This collection seemed like the perfect blend between Strong Is the New Pretty by Kate T. Parker and Brandon Stanton’s Humans of New York. So the wait to get approved for this ARC was nearly excruciating with me checking my emails every day for a week. But I’m glad to say that it lived up to the hype I created in my mind.

Since 2013 photographer Mihaela Noroc has traveled the world with her backpack and camera taking photos of everyday women to showcase the diversity of beauty all around us. The Atlas of Beauty is a collection of her photographs celebrating women from all corners of the world, revealing that beauty is everywhere, and that it comes in many different sizes and colors. Noroc’s colorful and moving portraits feature women in their local communities, ranging from the Amazon rainforest to London city streets, and from markets in India to parks in Harlem, visually juxtaposing the varied physical and social worlds these women inhabit. Packaged as a gift-worthy, hardcover book, The Atlas of Beauty presents a fresh perspective on the global lives of women today.

I have nothing but the utmost respect and admiration for the women featured in here. They bring dignity, strength, and inner beauty that shines from page to page. From each of them I learned or was reminded of something new, whether that be tolerance, kindness, resilience, natural and authentic beauty, serenity, strength, and generosity. Plus, the vibrant and colorful photographs really brought something new to the table.

However, as captivating as the images were, I feel like the words that accompanied them, save for a few, failed to move me. In comparison to the collections I mentioned at the start of my review, it was difficult to ignore how bland the text is. I wanted to see what lies beneath the surface, to feel like we’re getting to know the person in front of us… But again, save for a few, I rarely encountered it in this collection. Also: I’m low-key sad that the utterly powerful cover picture wasn’t included in here.

On a brighter note, I’d love to share the photographs of the enthralling women that captivated me:

The Atlas of Beauty 1-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 2-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 4-- bookspoils

Pokhara, Nepal:The Atlas of Beauty 3-- bookspoils

Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan:The Atlas of Beauty 5-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 6-- bookspoilsThe Atlas of Beauty 7-- bookspoils

New York, USA:The Atlas of Beauty 8-- bookspoils

Wakhan Corridor, Afghanistan:The Atlas of Beauty 9-- bookspoils

Tehran, Iran:The Atlas of Beauty 10-- bookspoils

Nampan, Myanmar:The Atlas of Beauty 11-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 12-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 13-- bookspoils

 

Amazon Rainforest, Ecuador:The Atlas of Beauty 14-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 15-- bookspoils

I was truly surprised to see Eden Saban in the above, since she’s quite well-known in Israel, thanks to being on the last season of Big Brother. So now I’m quite eager to find out if the author randomly stumbled upon her and asked for a picture, or if they set this up….

The Atlas of Beauty 16-- bookspoils

 

The Atlas of Beauty 17-- bookspoils

On that bitter-sweet note, the sharp women and girls featured in The Atlas of Beauty have made a new fan out of me. I’m definitely interested in keeping up with Mihaela Noroc’s photography works next in the making.

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Expected publication: September 26th, 2017

5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying The Atlas of Beauty, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

Review: What We Buried by Caitlyn Siehl

“You are not Atlas and the world is not a burden for you to carry.” 

I’ve seen this poetry collection a number of times online, but had no idea what to expect until I opened the book and was instantly enchanted by the second poem titled “Three Questions.” And since I can’t narrow it down to just one quote – I’m in love with the whole of it and how each line adds something more – I’ve decided to share the full poem:

“My mother tells me
that when I meet someone I like,
I have to ask them three questions:

1. what are you afraid of?
2. do you like dogs?
3. what do you do when it rains?

of those three, she says the first one is the most important.
“They gotta be scared of something, baby. Everybody is. If they aren’t afraid of anything, then they don’t believe in anything, either.”I asked you what you were afraid of.
“spiders, mostly. being alone. little children, like, the ones who just learned how to push a kid over on the playground. oh and space. holy shit, space.” 
I asked you if you liked dogs.
“I have three.”
I asked you what you do when it rains.
“sleep, mostly. sometimes I sit at the window and watch the rain droplets race. I make a shelter out of plastic in my backyard for all the stray animals; leave them food and a place to sleep.”
he smiled like he knew.
like his mom told him the same 
thing.
“how about you?”

me?
I’m scared of everything.
of the hole in the o-zone layer,
of the lady next door who never
smiles at her dog,
and especially of all the secrets 
the government must be breaking
it’s back trying to keep from us.
I love dogs so much, you have no idea.
I sleep when it rains.
I want to tell everyone I love them.
I want to find every stray animal and bring them home.
I want to wake up in your hair
and make you shitty coffee
and kiss your neck
and draw silly stick figures of us.
I never want to ask anyone else
these questions
ever again.”

Naturally after that I went on with quite high expectations that were for the most part met. The pieces after the above, though, focused heavily on love and heartbreak and “I’m in love with the shape of you” style poems, which I wasn’t really feeling… Also, poems like “Do not fall in love with people like me” set my mood from 100 to 0 real quick.

But just when I was starting to worry that this collection was going to be all about relationships and their aftermath, the narrative shifted to center on feelings of strength with feminist undertones, and I was all the more enraptured. Here are a few of those:

What We Buried 1-- bookspoils

 

What We Buried 2-- bookspoils

 

What We Buried 3-- bookspoils

 

What We Buried 4-- bookspoils


In the end, I was won over by the sheer power I felt while reading about the ineffable strength and endurance, suffering and survival that was explored in What We Buried.

“We survive by surviving.
We do it unconsciously,
the way our bodies remember to
breathe, even when we’re asleep.
The first step is always deciding
to take the first step.”

Also, I listened to this groundbreaking song on repeat while reading, thanks to the most recent Skam clip that’s been utterly and completely carved into my heart:

3.5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying What We Buried, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

Review: Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls by Elena Favilli & Francesca Cavallo

I recently read Bad Girls Throughout History by Ann Shen and was naturally craving for more when I came across this equally fantastic collection of extraordinary women.

Illustrated by sixty female artists from every corner of the globe, Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls introduces us to one hundred remarkable women and their extraordinary lives, from Ada Lovelace to Malala, Elizabeth I to Serena Williams. Empowering, moving and inspirational, these are true fairy tales for heroines who definitely don’t need rescuing.

Initially I went in a bit worried that this would have the same set of women as in the aforementioned collection, but I needn’t have worried because Good Night Stories features a brand new exciting and enlightening group of women to the table (save for a few classics, of course).

And I just have to say that my heart soars every time I learn of books similar to this one that shine light on groups of courageous and inventive women. Plus, the illustrations are hypnotic and ethereal. Speaking of which, here are some of my favorite ladies I loved to learn about:

Ameenah Gurib-Fakim (1959–): President and Scientist.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 1-- bookspoilsAmna Al Haddad (1989–): Weightlifter.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 2-- bookspoilsAnn Makosinski (1997–): Inventor.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 3-- bookspoilsAstrid Lindgren (1907–2002): Writer.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 4-- bookspoilsLindgren has written some of my favorite childhood tales, so I was beyond ecstatic to read about her in here!!

Coy Mathis (2007–): Elementary School Student.
Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 5-- bookspoilsIt warmed my heart to see a transgender girl represented in Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls. It made the book that more accessible.

Eufrosina Cruz (1979–): Activist and Politician.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 6-- bookspoilsThe above quote speaks volumes to me.

Frida Kahlo (1907–1954): Painter.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 7-- bookspoils

Grace O’Malley (c. 1530–1603): Pirate.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 8-- bookspoils

Hatshepsut (1507–1458 BC): Pharaoh.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 9-- bookspoils

Jane Goodall (1934–): Primatologist.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 10-- bookspoils
Maud Stevens Wagner (1877–1961): Tattoo Artist.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 12-- bookspoilsI can’t stop staring at the detailed beauty of the above piece, especially once compared to the real picture:maud_stevens_wagner


This diverse collection of women — from different backgrounds, religions, disabilities, ethnicities, sexualities — was as inspiring as it gets. And not only was their courage and strength legendary, but I found their worldview on life and all its aspects to be very illuminating and comforting.

Bottom line: This is the quality content I’m here for in feminist collections.

5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!