Review: Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls by Elena Favilli & Francesca Cavallo

I recently read Bad Girls Throughout History by Ann Shen and was naturally craving for more when I came across this equally fantastic collection of extraordinary women.

Illustrated by sixty female artists from every corner of the globe, Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls introduces us to one hundred remarkable women and their extraordinary lives, from Ada Lovelace to Malala, Elizabeth I to Serena Williams. Empowering, moving and inspirational, these are true fairy tales for heroines who definitely don’t need rescuing.

Initially I went in a bit worried that this would have the same set of women as in the aforementioned collection, but I needn’t have worried because Good Night Stories features a brand new exciting and enlightening group of women to the table (save for a few classics, of course).

And I just have to say that my heart soars every time I learn of books similar to this one that shine light on groups of courageous and inventive women. Plus, the illustrations are hypnotic and ethereal. Speaking of which, here are some of my favorite ladies I loved to learn about:

Ameenah Gurib-Fakim (1959–): President and Scientist.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 1-- bookspoilsAmna Al Haddad (1989–): Weightlifter.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 2-- bookspoilsAnn Makosinski (1997–): Inventor.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 3-- bookspoilsAstrid Lindgren (1907–2002): Writer.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 4-- bookspoilsLindgren has written some of my favorite childhood tales, so I was beyond ecstatic to read about her in here!!

Coy Mathis (2007–): Elementary School Student.
Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 5-- bookspoilsIt warmed my heart to see a transgender girl represented in Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls. It made the book that more accessible.

Eufrosina Cruz (1979–): Activist and Politician.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 6-- bookspoilsThe above quote speaks volumes to me.

Frida Kahlo (1907–1954): Painter.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 7-- bookspoils

Grace O’Malley (c. 1530–1603): Pirate.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 8-- bookspoils

Hatshepsut (1507–1458 BC): Pharaoh.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 9-- bookspoils

Jane Goodall (1934–): Primatologist.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 10-- bookspoils
Maud Stevens Wagner (1877–1961): Tattoo Artist.Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 12-- bookspoilsI can’t stop staring at the detailed beauty of the above piece, especially once compared to the real picture:maud_stevens_wagner


This diverse collection of women — from different backgrounds, religions, disabilities, ethnicities, sexualities — was as inspiring as it gets. And not only was their courage and strength legendary, but I found their worldview on life and all its aspects to be very illuminating and comforting.

Bottom line: This is the quality content I’m here for in feminist collections.

5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

Review: Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

After having seen the scene below shared online, which was taken from this powerful short film, I immediately wanted to absorb myself in some much needed feminist literature. At which point I recalled the existence of Dear Ijeawele, which I’d gratefully received as an ARC.

*Trigger warning: rape. *

In We Should All be Feminists, her eloquently argued and much admired essay of 2014, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie proposed that if we want a fairer world we need to raise our sons and daughters differently. Here, in this remarkable new book, Adichie replies by letter to a friend’s request for help on how to bring up her newborn baby girl as a feminist. With its fifteen pieces of practical advice it goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century.

Discussing feminism, love, bodies, gender roles, marriage, rejecting likability, racism, sexism, white-privilege, privilege and inequality, body-image insecurities, female sexuality, periods, oppression, and so much more. “Where has this been all my life” was how I felt when I finished. A truly revolutionary book with a handful of innovative quotes that I’d liked to share next:

“Your feminist premise should be: I matter. I matter equally. Not ‘if only’. Not ‘as long as’. I matter equally. Full stop.”

“But here is a sad truth: our world is full of men and women who do not like powerful women. We have been so conditioned to think of power as male that a powerful woman is an aberration.”

“Teach her that if you criticize X in women but do not criticize X in men, then you do not have a problem with X, you have a problem with women.”

The above completely changed the way I perceive things. tumblr_omie8yumti1u4ypbyo7_4001

“Tell her that her body belongs to her and her alone, that she should never feel the need to say yes to something she does not want, or something she feels pressured to do. Teach her that saying no when no feels right is something to be proud of.”

All of the above feels both so personally and universally relevant. And after having completed Dear Ijeawele in one sitting, I have one last thing to say: MY HEART IS SO FULL AND GRATEFUL THAT THIS EXISTS.

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Expected publication: March 7th, 2017

5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Dear Ijeawele, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!

Review: Why I March by Abrams Books

I truly couldn’t have been more happier when I gracefully received my physical ARC of Why I March. In fact, I was so over the moon that my mom took notice and became curious when I showed her the beautiful book:Why I March 1-- bookspoils(I even painted my nails to match that gorgeous cover.)

We ended up browsing this powerful accumulation of photographs together, which made it that more precious for me. I’ll just never get tired of reading powerful collections about feminism and supporting immensely important causes (see: Why We March & Nasty Women).

On January 21, 2017, five million people in 82 countries and on all seven continents stood up with one voice. The Women’s March began with one cause, women’s rights, but quickly became a movement around the many issues that were hotly debated during the 2016 U.S. presidential race–immigration, health care, environmental protections, LGBTQ rights, racial justice, freedom of religion, and workers’ rights, among others.

Featuring images of people in snow gear in Antarctica; women holding “Love Trumps Hate” signs in Durban, South Africa; and little girls in the street of New York City; Why I March is organised by continent and showcases the recurring themes of inclusion and intersectionality that the March so embedded.

So without further ado, here are some of my favorite pieces:

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Why I March 12-- bookspoilsMy favorite, Uzo Aduba!!!

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I think it goes without saying that I’ll cherish this book for a long time to come. And also, let’s be real, show it to anyone who’s in my near proximity. My love runs so deep that I wasn’t even mad when I received a painful paper cut from flipping a certain page wrongly…

ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Expected publication:  February 21st, 2017

5/5 stars

Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Why I March, just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission!